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How Technology Will Easily Teach You How To Play Piano

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What is the latest impact that technology has had in your daily life? Of course, I am not talking about the raise of the internet or the growing adoption of mobile phones or any of this big trends. I mean things that really make a difference in your daily life thanks to recent technology developments.

For me, for example, is that in the past few months I haven’t been subscribed to any gym and I haven’t spent  much time cooking and buying groceries as I used to do before (which by the way I hated it).

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YOU CAN LEARN HOW TO PLAY PIANO NOW, CLICK HERE

Why? Well, because I have an app that knows exactly how fit I want to be and it delivers customised workouts that I can do at home or at the park, and I have another app which gives me a weekly plan based on my dietary requirements and goals. In my view, that’s pretty cool and I am learning a lot of stuff. Because that’s the deal with technology; it can make you more stupid if you don’t pay attention, but it can give you a lot if you spend some time trying to understand it.

So yes, I could, in theory, do the groceries as the app tells me to do it, without trying to understand it and do whatever it tells me to do: “buy 200 gr. of chicken, 3 potatoes and 1 apple”. That’s it…I would not even know why I bought it and I would eat it without thinking about what I am doing.

If I instead use the technology as a tool to discover more instead, I can actually learn a lot about food and diet. Why is he suggesting me that dish? Is bread considered a carbohydrate or a protein? If I want to decrease my weight why is he actually suggesting me to eat more during the day?

I think that’s the deal with technology: it will help you, but you have to be curious about it in order to not become dumber than before! And as in anything in life, when you add curiosity you can actually grow and learn a lot!

The guys over at Skoove understand it pretty well and they are applying it to the one thing that the majority of people wants to learn: playing an instrument. How can you learn to play the piano with technology? Just keep reading

They understand that technology is useful when it makes things easier and cheaper and get people curious about something, so they created the easiest way to learn piano!

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WITH SKOOVE YOU CAN LEARN PIANO WHENEVER YOU WANT AND AT A FRACTION OF TRADITIONAL LESSONS. CLICK HERE TO TRY NOW

With Skoove you can, in fact, learn the piano at your own pace and without spending a fortune.

You can login to Skoove whenever you want and whenever you feel like you want to practice and learn: they developed a system that makes you play your first melody within minutes, with the right technique and within the comfort of your room, with real time feedback that guides you to play correctly and on time. It teaches you how to read notes at the same time.

They developed a unique teaching method called “Listen, Learn, Play” that can get you playing your first melody within minutes, with the right technique and from the comfort of your room, with real time feedback that guides you to play correctly, on time. It teaches you to read music at the same time.

They launched their piano learning app a few months ago with one goal in mind:  to offer the easiest way to learn piano. Since then, users have already played 40,000 piano lessons online, and they love it!

I think this is the perfect fusion between technology and real life; with Skoove and with music in general you will never be “Just playing” like a robot as music is communication and you will discover that. Starting with the first notes, you´ll create something unique that represents yourself, and that is, what I call art!

 

Further reading: Why you should consider learning with a piano app

3 thoughts on “How Technology Will Easily Teach You How To Play Piano”

  1. Having spent 4 years at Music College learning the piano between the ages of 19 – 23 and 10 years previous practicing for many hours and having been a professional pianist fort over 30 years I assure readers that this is utter and total rubbish. I shudder to think of the bad habits that this will lead to. There is no alternative if you wish to learn properly to the old way of finding a good teacher and paying for the lessons. Short cuts such as this are a dead end.

  2. Hi Nigel, thanks for your feedback. Skoove lessons have been built by top professional piano teachers so we know what you are talking about and agree with you that there are no shortcuts. For the same reason, we also don’t consider Skoove as a standalone platform to build a successful professional career in music, but rather as a tool available 24/7 to learn how to play and assist in the initial stages of music learning, which is by no means irreconcilable with having a personal teacher too! The majority of our users would have never started to play piano without Skoove as many of them don’t have the time or money to commit to traditional piano lessons and we are proud to give them the chance to start their musical journey. Would be great if you could have a go with Skoove, we are sure that you will agree with us that it’s properly build to teach piano in the right way. Thank you.

  3. My piano adventure started at 7 and I went through all the grades and wound up with an LTCL (performer’s) after about 30 aeons and practising 5 hours a day. As Nigel Morley below says, there are no shortcuts and you really need a teacher to stop you dong things all wrong, and show you the way. If you haven’t started by the time you’re 13 or 14 you’ll probably not progress past about grade VI as your hands will never be sufficiently supple.

    If you want to see how an enthusiastic late starter gets on, look for the Ed Balls clips on YouTube – and he’s been playing about 2 or 3 years. If you’re happy to play at that level then that’s great, and the more you practise the better you will be. As the blurb says, it’s wonderful to be able to play when you want and how you want (well to be honest, no-one ever plays as well as they would like). Don’t expect to be another Chopin, Liszt, Rachmaninov or Paderewski.

    Will this amazing device be the answer ? I have my doubts, and I’ve seen loads of tutors / gizmos and heaven knows what over the years touting the same promise – and they’ve all just faded away never to be heard of again.

    Sorry to be cynical – perhaps an early adopter can prove its efficacy – that would prove it.

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